Proactive Positivity: Make your 2017 ‘Goodie Jar’

Well, I went ahead and did it: I made a “Goodie Jar” for 2017.

You see all these great ideas floating around the internet around the New Year in order to inspire gratitude and positivity for the next 12 months. Most reshare these ideas on Facebook and they recirculate a few times around your social circle, and then everyone forgets about it. Well, most of them do. I am usually one of them.

Like a jar to store bits of paper you write about happy, good things that happened over the year to dump out and read some New Year’s eve next year.

2013memoryjarnewyears

Like this one I found floating around Google.

Initially, though it was a cute idea, I scoffed.

“I don’t need a jar to help remind me to be grateful and positive and happy with my life,” I shrugged.

But yet, something about it appealed to me. It’s a project that I can work on and make beautiful throughout the year. Plus, I love glass mason jars and writing. I already have about five mason jars in a variety of sizes full of stuff from seeds, to seashells to dried flower arrangements on my shelves.

Inspired, I rummaged through our pantry for a good sized mason jar to start with. Perhaps eventually I will change to a prettier, more elaborate one. Maybe I might run out of room for happy colored strips of paper and need a bigger jar. Who knows!

For now, it’s as simple as it gets: A plain piece of white paper to label it, and small pieces of paper cut up just large enough to write a brief thought or event.

20170105_084642

Believe it or not, this positivity thing is actually quite addicting.

I only just started today, but I’ve found four somethings that made me happy in the last four days. I could actually come up with more. But let’s give me something to do for the next 360 days!

Want to start your own?

Let’s do it! Remember, this is for you. Your eyes only. It doesn’t have to be pretty or fancy. It doesn’t even have to be a jar. Use whatever receptacle you think will work! Coffee can, colored vase, an old teapot you don’t use.

Google “memory jars” or try Pinterest and get ideas. I still plan on adding some crochet to crown mine, and perhaps some appliques to decorate the jar. Not only will I fill the jar, but I will make this jar my own over the next 12 months.

Also, be sure to place it somewhere you will see everyday to remember to add to it. I have mine next to where I charge my cell phone every night.

Then, cut up small bits of paper, large enough to write on and fold it for the jar. Personally, I write two pieces of paper a day: Something good that happened to me, and one thing that I are grateful for each day. I even write the date, but I am a hardcore chronicler. You may decide you don’t want to. Also, don’t feel like you have to be stingy with adding to the jar, either. If you had several good things happen to you or find more than one thing to express gratitude for that day, go for it! It’s your goodie jar.

You may decide to have different color paper every day, or just one. You may want to write in a different language, use a calligraphy pen or a typewriter, or maybe print out a small picture instead of using words. Use your imagination and follow your heart.

Remember the more we train ourselves to focus on the positive each day, the more joy and abundance we will attract. Because what we truly focus on in life is what we drive toward on this journey.

May you truly have a Happy New Year in 2017.

Advertisements

Stressed and cope with food? My Emotional Eating Workshop can help

Plateful of Soul - Holistic Health & Lifetyle Coaching

If you’ve ever struggled with weight loss due to stress and emotional eating,  an upcoming local Arizona workshop can help. My workshop called “Coping with Food: Overcoming Emotional Eating” will be held on Saturday, Aug. 6, from 10 a.m.-12 p.m. at Herbalicious of Arizona (423 N Florence St, Casa Grande, AZ 85122). Cost is $20. Participants will learn how to recognize negative behavioral eating patterns, learn mindfulness techniques to help in identifying and dealing with stressful emotions and alter behaviors, and gain a deeper understanding about the mind/body connection.

Interested? Email me at Lindsey@LindseyGemme.com for more information.

View original post

Do you dread asking for help?

Asking for help for me is like the tongue-in-cheek stereotype of the man refusing to ask for directions.

I actually get why men do it. It is so much more gratifying for me to be able to complete a task or “mission impossible” on my own without outside intervention. To ask for help indicates that I’ve failed in some way.

At least that’s how it feels.

For example, one day my husband and I were waiting around for a sales associate at a hardware superstore to come and help us with an item. After a few minutes, it became painfully apparent that if I didn’t find a bathroom – it would not end well. Continue reading

Two life coaches walk into a bookstore…

book

For my husband and I, the bookstore is our sanctuary. It’s become a joke between us that when we decide to go to a Barnes & Noble, we’ll “close down the store.” Because it never fails – we’ll go in when it’s still daylight and somehow never make it back out before dark.

We have our favorite genres, of course. My husband will wander over to the art and graphic novel section, or peruse shelves populated with ancient literature. For me, I often find myself thumbing through cookbooks or the craft section.

There is one section, though, that my husband and I overlap: Self-Help. Continue reading

Let’s talk about blood (post share)

A potent new feminine-hygiene ad gets unabashedly bloody to talk about periods—and, in the process, it nails what’s missing in the rest of the advertising world’s “female empowerment” movement. The ad for Bodyform, a UK maker of pads and liners, features a host of badass women—surfers, boxers, rugby players, dancers, and even a medieval knight—getting bloodied, but never backing down. From the blood-pumping score and quick cuts, […]

via “No blood should hold us back”: A feminine-hygiene ad finally gets women’s empowerment right — Quartz

Love, acceptance, and our “hair-down-there”

Down there.woman-1401617_1280

Such a personal place. And when it comes to our hairstyle preferences, especially down there, SOCIAL TABOO gets stamped all over it. But I’m going to bust that wide open for a few minutes. Because when our hair down there gets between us and love and self-acceptance, we need to talk about it.

So a few weeks ago, a friend and I were sitting on my couch, giggling and chatting as good girlfriends tend to do. Somehow we ended up on the subject of the twisted public image of women’s bodies. And as things go, we brushed up against the subject of sexual expectations.

She then told me a story about her, her hair, a play and an ex-boyfriend.

Continue reading

Can meditation reverse anxiety and low self-esteem?

meditate blog

Breathing can help prolong your life. Well, especially when you combine it with meditation.

In an age where we are constantly multi-tasking, plugged in, inundated with images, facts and emails and enduring constant over-stimulation, it’s no wonder we’re exhausted and a little frayed at the edges each day.

And when you have added stress, it can affect your body in many ways both physically and mentally. So whether you are going through a difficult time in your life or are struggling with an ongoing mental health issue, adopting mindfulness could be just what the doctor ordered.

Continue reading

Who moved my trash?

who moved my trash

Two weeks ago, my husband and I moved our kitchen trash can. It didn’t seem like a big issue at the time.

For five years, I had it stored away behind the pantry door. While it’s in the kitchen, technically, it serves as the main garbage receptacle for our home. I had picked the pantry because I find trash to be unsightly. And it can smell. Plus, I had cats. Cats who get too curious for their own good, sometimes. Three of ’em.

But my husband had a few good points: Moving the trash to beside the sink would reduce the amount of food droppings and other spillage across the kitchen to the pantry, and, ewww, fewer germs and residue on the pantry door handle.

I had to admit that his logic was sound. It seemed like a better, more sanitary choice.

That was the case until the first 300 times I went to throw something away.

Continue reading